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2012 College Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees

2012 Induction Ceremony

Seven new members were inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame on June 30, 2012, in the annual celebration of the greatest players in past and present college baseball.

College Baseball’s Night of Champions in Lubbock, Texas honored these men for their addition to the Hall of Fame: Southern outfielder Lou Brock; Lewis-Clark State College coach Ed Cheff; Georgia Tech shortstop Nomar Garciaparra; San Jacinto College coach and Rice coach Wayne Graham; Wisconsin-Oshkosh shortstop Tim Jorgensen; Arizona coach Frank Sancet; and Florida outfielder and pitcher Brad Wilkerson.

All of the inductees said they found it special being recognized in such a fashion and were honored to be the seventh class inducted in the Hall of Fame that showcases college baseball’s rich past.


Lou Brock

Southern University / 1958-60

Lou's induction speech

After a freshman season in which he hit .180, Lou Brock became the star of the Southern University baseball team that won the 1959 NAIA College World Series, becoming the first and only HBCU baseball team to win a national title at any level. That year, Brock his .524 for the season with five home runs, eight doubles and six triples. Following the season, he was selected to play for the United States national team in the Pan American Games.

In 1960, Brock’s junior season, he again led the Jaguars to the NAIA College World Series, where they lost in the semifinals. As he was in 1959, Brock was named to the NAIA All-Tournament team in 1960. For the year, Lou Brock hit .351 and stole 18 bases.

After his junior year, Lou Brock signed a contract with the Chicago Cubs and after a 19-year pro career, Brock earned entry into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

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Ed Cheff

Lewis-Clark State College / 1977-2010

Ed gets inducted

In 34 years at Lewis-Clark State College, Cheff's teams won 16 NAIA national championships, and he's the NAIA all-time wins leader for a coach at one school. He posted a 1,705-430-2 record with LCSC for a .799 winning percentage. His win total ranks second only to Wichita State’s Gene Stephenson’s 1,724 wins with the same program in all of college baseball. His win total also is fourth all time among all college baseball coaches. (Cheff also won 120 games in four years of junior college coaching at Lower Columbia College.)

CHEFF'S STATS AT THE NAIA WORLD SERIES
Appearances: 28 (1978-80, '82-92, '95-96, '99-10)
Overall record: 114-31 (.786 winning percentage, best by any team with more than five games played)
Championships: 16 (1984-85, '87-92, '96, '99-00, '02-03, '06-08)
Finishes: 1st - 16, 2nd - 5, 3rd - 3, 4th - 1

OTHER CHEFF FACTS
• Coach of the Year titles: 8 (1983, '87, '91-92, '96, '99, '02)
• Inducted into NAIA Hall of Fame in 1994
• Inducted into America Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2006
• Coached on the 1991 and 1994 USA National Team staff and the 1994 World Championship staff

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Nomar Garciaparra

Georgia Institute of Technology / 1992-94

Nomar's induction speech

First Team All-American: Sporting News (1993)
First Team All-American: Collegiate Baseball, Baseball America, ABCA, NCBWA (1994)
Freshman All-American: Baseball America, Collegiate Baseball (1992)
Two-time Academic All-American: 1993-94
ACC Freshman of the Year: 1992

Garciaparra hit .427 with 16 home runs, 73 RBIs and 33 stolen bases in 1994 while leading Georgia Tech to the finals of the College World Series.

• Named to the College World Series Legends Team in 2010.

Year Age G-GS AB R H AVG 2B 3B HR RBI SB
1992 18 61-60 226 45 82 .363 18 2 3 51 25
1993 19 49-47 172 39 51 .297 14 1 4 42 8
1994 20 64-62 274 92 117 .427 26 11 16 73 33
Total 174-169 672 176 250 .372 58 14 23 166 66
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Wayne Graham

San Jacinto College / 1981-91
Rice University / 1992-Present

Wayne's induction speech

HIGHLIGHTS
Record: 1,445-453 (30 years)
Five NJCAA National Championships: (San Jacinto 1985, '86, '87, '89, '90)
College World Series Championship: Rice - 2003

• Named Collegiate Baseball Magazine's Junior College Coach of the Century

At Rice, Graham has amassed 912 wins and maintained a .716 win percentage over 20 full seasons.

The Owls' winning percentage in the nation over the last 13 full seasons is .742 from 1999-2011, better than every other Division I program.

Graham has coached 30 different Rice players to a total of 45 All-America awards, including three national players of the year (Lance Berkman, Damon Thames and Anthony Rendon).

In 2007, Graham had 14 Owls drafted in that year alone. The 14 draft picks tied the college record for the most players selected from one school in a single year. He has developed 14 Owls into first-round Najor League Draft picks, including as recently as 2011, when Anthony Rendon was the sixth player taken overall.

Rice has won 16 conference championships in a row, including Conference USA regular-season and tournament crowns, all nine Western Athletic Conference titles during the Owls' tenure in that league (1997-2005) and the final Southwest Conference Championship in 1996. The 2011 season was Rice's 17th straight appearance in an NCAA Regional.

The Owls have been to the NCAA Super Regionals nine times since the format was adopted in 1999. The Blue & Gray has been to the College World Series seven times since 1997. In 2003, Graham led Rice to the school's first team national championship in any sport.

In 1984, he led San Jac to the first of seven consecutive 50-win seasons and the national junior college tournament. A loss in the championship game only served to fuel the fires that led to three straight national titles in 1985-87. Another runner-up showing in 1988 was followed by two more titles in '89 and '90, giving the Gators five championships in a six-year span while preparing dozens of players for major college and/or professional careers.

Graham's honors at San Jac were nearly endless. He was named Collegiate Baseball Magazine's Junior College Coach of the Century, as well as the newspaper's Coach of the Decade for the 1980s. He was named the national junior college coach of the year five times and the top Texas junior college coach six times. His uniform No. 37 was retired by San Jacinto, and he was inducted into the Junior College Hall of Fame in May 1995.

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Tim Jorgensen

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh / 1992-95

Tim's induction speech

Jorgensen, who played baseball for head coach Tom Lechnir's Titans from 1992-95, epitomized raw power. His 162-game playing career at UW-Oshkosh featured a NCAA Division III-record 70 home runs. It also included 234 hits in 563 at-bats for a .416 batting average, 237 RBIs, 200 runs scored, 33 doubles and nine triples.

Jorgensen’s career accomplishments helped UW-Oshkosh register an impressive four-year run. During that time, he helped the Titans fashion a 144-32 record, capture one NCAA Division III title, advance to four NCAA Division III World Series and claim four WIAC crowns.

Jorgensen began to make a name of his own in his first season with the Titans. Jorgensen helped the club to a 36-8 record, a WIAC championship and a fifth-place finish at the NCAA Division III World Series by hitting .394 with six home runs, 43 runs scored and 35 RBIs.

In 1993, Jorgensen battled through an injury-plagued season to help the Titans to a 28-15 record, a WIAC championship and a second-place finish at the NCAA Division III World Series. Playing in just 30 games, he hit .260 for UW-Oshkosh with two home runs and 17 RBIs.

Jorgensen returned at full strength for the 1994 season and teamed with future big league pitcher Jarrod Washburn to lead the Titans to a 41-4 record, another WIAC championship and the NCAA Division III title. Jorgensen was named the 1994 NCAA Division III Player of the Year after hitting .455 with 23 home runs, 64 RBIs and 58 runs scored. Following the NCAA Division III World Series, Jorgensen decided not to sign a professional contract after being selected in the 28th round of Major League Baseball’s First-Year Player Draft by the San Diego Padres.

Jorgensen returned for the 1995 season and responded by posting astounding numbers and leading UW-Oshkosh to a 39-5 record, another WIAC championship and a third-place finish at the NCAA Division III World Series. Jorgensen repeated as the NCAA Division III Player of the Year that season after hitting .491 with a NCAA Division III record 39 home runs, a NCAA Division III-record 121 RBIs and 83 runs scored. In all, he established eight NCAA Division III season records, including grand slams with six.

In a May 14, 1995, doubleheader, Jorgensen hit six homers and 16 RBIs in to lead the Titans to the WIAC title. In an 18-7 win in the nightcap, Jorgensen completed the rarest of cycles by hitting a solo home run, a two-run home run, a three-run home run and a grand slam. His four home runs in that game tied an NCAA Division III record.

JORGENSEN'S RESUME
NCAA Division III Player Of The Year: 1994-95
NCAA Division III All-America: 1994-95
All-WIAC First Team: 1992, '94-95
NCAA Division III World Series Most Valuable Player: 1994
NCAA Division III All-World Series: 1993-95
NCAA Division III Championship Team: 1994
NCAA Division III World Series Team: 1992-95
WIAC Championship Team: 1992-95
• Eighth-round Draft pick of The Cleveland Indians in 1995
• Helped UW-Oshkosh to a four-year record Of 144-32
• UW-Oshkosh career totals include .416 batting average, 237 RBIs, 200 runs scored and 70 home runs in 162 games

NCAA DIVISION III CAREER RECORD
Home runs: 70 from 1992-95

NCAA DIVISION III SEASON RECORDS
Runs per game: 1.89 in 1995
Home runs: 39 in 1995
Home runs per game: 0.89 in 1995
Grand slams: 6 in 1995
Total bases: 218 in 1995
Slugging percentage: 1.275 in 1995
RBIs: 121 in 1995
RBIs per game: 2.75 in 1995

NCAA DIVISION III GAME RECORD
Home runs: 4 vs. UW-Eau Claire in 1995
Sports Illustrated “Faces In The Crowd” in June 26, 1995, issue

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Frank Sancet

University of Arizona / 1950-72

Son Bill Sancet's induction speech

"Pop" McKale brought Frank Sancet to the University of Arizona in 1947 as assistant baseball coach. He also was backfield coach for football, freshman football coach and freshman basketball coach during those early years. In 1950, he took over for Pop as head baseball coach and went on to distinguish himself over the next 23 seasons, leading the baseball Wildcats to four conference championships and 10 trips to the College World Series. Frank brought Arizona baseball a national reputation for excellence. He coached 28 All-Americans and 66 of his players signed professional contracts. He retired as the second-winningest coach in the history of college baseball with a record of 832 wins, 238 losses and eight ties.

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Brad Wilkerson

University of Florida / 1996-98

Brad's induction speech

• Named as the 1998 Collegiate Player of the Year by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association and won the Smith Award given to the National Collegiate Baseball Player of the Year as selected by CoSIDA.

• First three-time All-American in Florida school history

1998
First-Team All-American: Baseball America, Baseball Weekly, Collegiate Baseball, NCBWA, Sporting News

1997
First-Team All-American: Baseball America, NCBWA
Second-Team All-American: Collegiate Baseball, Sporting News

1996
First-Team All-American: NCBWA
Second-Team All-American: Collegiate Baseball

Finalist for the 1998 Golden Spikes Award ... Broke UF career batting average, HR, RBI, runs, walks and slugging percentage standards ... Broke seven individual season batting records and tied/reset seven individual performance marks ... Hit 55 career home runs, becoming the eighth player in SEC history to hit 50 or more home runs ... Reached base safely in 141 consecutive games at one point of his career and reached base in 190 of 195 career games ... First player in NCAA history to hit 20 home runs, win 10 games and steal 20 bases ... Most Outstanding Player, 1996 NCAA East Regional ... 1996 College World Series All-Tournament team ... All-SEC and ABCA All-South Region, 1996-98 ... Three-time SEC Player of the Week during his career.

Year Age AVG G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI TB SLG BB HBP SO OBP SF SH SB ATT PO A
1996 19 .407 67 241 71 98 22 3 9 68 153 .635 76 1 34 .547 2 1 14 19 247 20
1997 20 .386 64 236 82 91 15 3 23 76 181 .767 63 5 35 .508 9 0 11 15 465 41
1998 21 .386 64 222 86 77 13 3 23 70 165 .743 85 8 29 .538 1 1 21 26 222 45
Total .381 195 699 239 266 50 9 55 214 499 .714 224 14 98 .531 12 2 46 60 934 106


Year Age ERA W-L G GS CG SHO SV IP H R ER BB SO 2B 3B HR BF AVG WP HBP
1996 19 2.97 5-2 30 0 0 0 6 63 2/3 59 25 21 28 67 11 0 3 275 .252 3 5
1997 20 4.56 11-4 26 7 2 0 4 79 73 48 40 34 89 17 1 5 344 .246 5 6
1998 21 4.98 10-5 19 19 1 0 0 123 134 85 68 69 136 24 0 15 567 .279 5 5
Total 4.37 26-11 75 26 3 0 10 265 2/3 266 158 129 131 292 52 1 23 1186 .263 13 16

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Calendar & Events


Jan. 31, 2014
First Pitch Luncheon

June 27, 2014
Night of Champions Welcome BBQ

June 28, 2014
College Baseball's Night of Champions